John Ruskin: “the Great Spirit of nature is as deep and unapproachable in the lowest as in the noblest objects”

John Ruskin

John Ruskin

The chapter “Of the Foreground” in the first volume of John Ruskin’s Modern Painters ends:

One lesson, however, we are invariably taught by all, however approached or viewed, that the work of the Great Spirit of nature is as deep and unapproachable in the lowest as in the noblest objects; that the Divine mind is as visible in its full energy of operation on every lowly bank and mouldering stone, as in the lifting of the pillars of heaven, and settling the foundation of the earth; and that to the rightly perceiving mind, there is the same infinity, the same majesty, the same power, the same unity, and the same perfection, manifest in the casting of the clay as in the scattering of the cloud, in the mouldering of the dust as in the kindling of the daystar. (3.492 — 93)

For more about and by John Ruskin, please see:
John Ruskin, Giotto, and William Henry Fox Talbot
.

Another quote from John Ruskin:
John Ruskin: “You must either make a tool of the creature, or a man of him”

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