Tag Archives: translation

Laozi, Chapter 19

Daodejing — The Classic About Ways and Instances Translated by William P. Coleman If holiness disappears and wisdom is thrown away, then people benefit a hundred ways. If benevolence disappears and righteousness is thrown away, then people return to filial … Continue reading

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Li Bai — Jade stairs complaint

Jade stairs complaint Li Bai 701-762 CE (translated by William P. Coleman) The jade stairs give birth to clear dew; in the late night it permeates gauze stockings. Yet she lowers the crystal curtain; jewel pendants tinkle, and she looks … Continue reading

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Lao Tzu, Chapter 18

Daodejing — The Classic About Ways and Instances Translated by William P. Coleman After the great way had been forgotten, there was benevolence and rectitude. Intelligence and knowledge appeared, and there was great falseness. The six relationships fell out of harmony, … Continue reading

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Lao Tzu, Chapter 17

Tao Te Ching — The Classic about Ways And Instances Lao Tzu (Translated, with comments, by William P. Coleman) Chapter 17 The best ruler? His people know he exists. The next best? They love and praise him. The next, they … Continue reading

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Wang Wei — In the Mountains

In the Mountains Wang Wei 701-761 CE (translated by William P. Coleman) In Bramble Stream, white stones jut out; the air’s cold, so red leaves are sparse. The mountain path is clear after rain; It’s the sky-greenery that wets my … Continue reading

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Wang Wei — Bird-singing Stream

Bird-singing Stream Wang Wei 701-761 CE (translated by William P. Coleman) I’m at leisure. Cassia blossoms fall, and it’s a quiet night, solitary in the mountains. The moon rises — and startles the mountain bird that sings from time to … Continue reading

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Wang Wei — Hsin-i Village

Hsin-i Village Wang Wei 701-761 CE (translated by William P. Coleman) At the tree top, the hibiscus are in flower; there on the mountain, they put forth red calyxes. There’s a hut by the stream, silent, with no one — … Continue reading

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